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Featured Titles
  • Eavesdropping on the Most Segregated Hour: A City’s Clergy Reflect on Racial Reconciliation
    Edited by: Andrew M. Manis   With: Sandy Dwayne Martin
    Andrew M. Manis recruited clergy from a broad spectrum of interracial, interreligious, and interdenominational communities of faith in Macon, Georgia, to address their congregations on the perennially controversial theme of racial reconciliation. Acknowledging the truism that eleven o'clock on Sunday morning remains the "most segregated hour" of the week, Manis argues that neither White nor Black congregations are familiar with what the other hears about race on the other side of the color line. Fourteen clergy bring their scriptural interpretations to bear on the longstanding problem of White supremacy in American life and culture.
  • Presidential Archivist: A Memoir
    By author: David E. Alsobrook
    Like many other aspiring young historians in the 1970s, David Alsobrook fell victim to the "PhD glut" and the shrinking number of vacancies in traditional academic jobs. His completion of the Auburn University Archival Training Program in 1975 provided him with an alternative career pathway as a historian beyond teaching and research. A sizable portion of this memoir focuses on Alsobrook's archival career at the Alabama Department of Archives and History and three Presidential libraries.
  • Listening for God: Malamud, O’Connor, Updike, & Morrison
    By author: Peter C. Brown
    We live in a secular age, where the world and its ways seem to indicate the absence of God. The testimony of ancient and latter-day prophets requires more faith (or credulity) than most of us can manage. Can we still find spiritual truths that will restore a sense of a higher meaning to our lives? For millennia, people have looked to literature, to scriptures, epics, poems, plays, novels, and films for insights into the human condition. In our increasingly rationalized world, some of these contemporary storytellers--like a Bernard Malamud, Flannery O’Connor, John Updike, or Toni Morrison--stretch their art to find new words for the sacred. Brown invites us to reread them to listen for this elusive transcendence, a sacred mystery that rebukes both the atheist's weak humanism and the believer's naïve supernaturalism.

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