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Featured Titles
  • Tales from Georgia's Gnat Line
    By author: Larry Walker
    TALES FROM GEORGIA'S GNAT LINE is about the South--the Deep South; Larry Walker’s part of the world. It’s about good people, and some not so good. It’s about a part of the United States that was, and is, somewhat different from the rest. And it’s about cotton, because in many ways cotton caused Southerners to do some of the things that otherwise good people would not have done. It’s never been easy to be a Southerner, black or white. This book is about the South of the past, the present, and, if read carefully, of the future.
  • “The Showy Town of Savannah”: The Story of the Architect William Jay
    In December 1817, the English architect William Jay arrived at the busy port of Savannah, Georgia. In the coming four and a half years, he designed several public buildings and private residences in Savannah and a few structures in Charleston, South Carolina. All of his work was remarkable; yet, soon after his departure in 1822, only vague recollections of Jay survived in Savannah, and in Charleston he was forgotten altogether. Early in the twentieth century, Jay’s work was observed by a few prominent architectural historians, and accounts of his life and labors began to appear. He suffered many disappointments, but he gained remarkable achievements, not least of which was his lasting imprint on “showy Savannah.”
  • Camp Oglethorpe: Macon's Unknown Civil War Prisoner of War Camp, 1862-1864
    The history of Camp Oglethorpe is largely overshadowed by that of nearby Camp Sumter in Andersonville, Georgia. It exists primarily as a footnote in the telling of Civil War prison narratives. A comprehensive reckoning reveals a saga that brings to light Camp Oglethorpe’s decades-long role as a military training ground for Georgia’s volunteer regiments and as a venue for national agricultural fairs which drew thousands of visitors to Macon. Its proud heritage, however, attracted the attention of leaders of the Confederate government. To the chagrin of Macon’s citizens, the acreage at the foot of Seventh Street was surreptitiously repurposed for brief periods in 1862 and 1864.
  • A Giant from Georgia: The Life of U.S. Senator Walter F. George, 1878-1957
    By author: Jamie H. Cockfield
    This biography concentrates on the numerous legislative and diplomatic achievements of U.S. Senator Walter F. George (fl. 1922-1957), the son of a tenant farmer, who rose to become one of the most powerful men in the United States. His successes as a legislator (agricultural legislation, vocational education, work on the Bricker Amendment) and later in his role as a major authority on foreign policy made him a leader in the Senate. In his thirty-five year Senate career, George worked though the "Roaring Twenties," the Great Depression, American rearmament, World War II, and the Cold War. George made a positive mark on each of these historic events.

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