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A Natural History of Cumberland Island, Georgia
By author: Carol Ruckdeschel
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H932
ISBN: 9780881466096
Availability: In stock
Price: $35.00
QTY: More Info
Having lived on Cumberland Island for more than forty years, Carol Ruckdeschel’s goal has been to document present conditions of the island’s flora and fauna, establishing a baseline from which to assess future changes. Since the late 1960s, she has witnessed many changes and trends that are often overlooked by those carrying out short-term observations. This compilation of data, along with historic information, presents the most comprehensive picture of the island’s flora, fauna, geology, and ecology to date. This volume will satisfy a general interest in the ecology of Cumberland and other Georgia barrier islands. New information on individual species is presented, contributing to its value as a reference for the Southeast.

The Strange Journey of the Confederate Constitution: And Other Stories from Georgia’s Historical Past
By author: William Rawlings
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H939
ISBN: 9780881466263
Availability: In stock
Price: $29.00
THE STRANGE JOURNEY OF THE CONFEDERATE CONSTITUTION is a collection of seventeen articles and essays on topics in Georgia and Southern history. Individual chapters are arranged by era and cover subjects ranging from The Great Yazoo Fraud of the 1790s, to Jefferson Davis and the Confederate Treasure of the 1860s, to the Reign of Terror visited by the Ku Klux Klan in Macon of the 1920s. While academic, the book’s varying topics are aimed at readers with a general interest in the intriguing and often convoluted history of the South.

Georgia’s Civil War: Conflict on the Home Front
By author: David Williams
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H942
ISBN: 9780881466317
Availability: In stock
Price: $35.00
In September 1864, at a gathering in Macon, Georgia, Confederate President Jefferson Davis admitted that two-thirds of his troops were absent, most without leave. Some had opposed secession to begin with. Others came to see the conflict as a “rich man’s war.” But it was hardship and hunger among their families that drew most soldiers back home. For more than a century and a half, historians have often ignored the Confederacy’s home front difficulties, which had so much to do with desertion and defeat. Anyone with even a passing knowledge of the Civil War knows that Confederate armies were outnumbered two to one. In a presumptive way, the manpower disparity is usually attributed to the North’s larger population. Lost in that simplistic view is the impact that desertion had on sapping the Confederacy’s fighting strength. And this is but one of the many critical issues historians too often brush aside.

Combat Chaplain: The Life and Civil War Experiences of Rev. James H. McNeilly
By author: M. Todd Cathey
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H947
ISBN: 9780881466379
Availability: In stock
Price: $35.00
Born 9 June 1838, James H. McNeilly grew up near Charlotte in Dickson County, Tennessee. At age thirteen, McNeilly was sworn in as deputy circuit court clerk of Dickson County. Raised in a devout Presbyterian home, he received his undergraduate degree from Jackson College in Columbia, Tennessee. Just as the Civil War broke out, he had earned his Doctor of Divinity from Danville Theological Seminary at Danville, Kentucky. As McNeilly returned home to Dickson County, in the summer of 1861, he preached on Sunday and recruited troops for the Confederacy during the week. In October 1861, McNeilly traveled to nearby Fort Donelson, where he offered his services to the South.

What the Yankees Did to Us: Sherman's Bombardment and Wrecking of Atlanta
By author: Stephen Davis
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: P554
ISBN: 9780881466409
Availability: In stock
Price: $30.00
The name of Union general William T. Sherman is still reviled in Atlanta, 150 years after his soldiers devastated this important Georgia city. Thirty-seven days of artillery bombardment, July-August 1864, wrecked countless downtown buildings and killed perhaps a score of civilians. Longtime Atlantan Stephen Davis describes Sherman’s shelling in detail unmatched in the Civil War literature.

A Giant from Georgia: The Life of U.S. Senator Walter F. George, 1878-1957
By author: Jamie H. Cockfield
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H955
ISBN: 9780881466768
Availability: In stock
Price: $45.00
This biography concentrates on the numerous legislative and diplomatic achievements of U.S. Senator Walter F. George (fl. 1922-1957), the son of a tenant farmer, who rose to become one of the most powerful men in the United States. His successes as a legislator (agricultural legislation, vocational education, work on the Bricker Amendment) and later in his role as a major authority on foreign policy made him a leader in the Senate. In his thirty-five year Senate career, George worked though the "Roaring Twenties," the Great Depression, American rearmament, World War II, and the Cold War. George made a positive mark on each of these historic events.

Camp Oglethorpe: Macon's Unknown Civil War Prisoner of War Camp, 1862-1864
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H967
ISBN: 9780881466911
Availability: In stock
Price: $35.00
The history of Camp Oglethorpe is largely overshadowed by that of nearby Camp Sumter in Andersonville, Georgia. It exists primarily as a footnote in the telling of Civil War prison narratives. A comprehensive reckoning reveals a saga that brings to light Camp Oglethorpe’s decades-long role as a military training ground for Georgia’s volunteer regiments and as a venue for national agricultural fairs which drew thousands of visitors to Macon. Its proud heritage, however, attracted the attention of leaders of the Confederate government. To the chagrin of Macon’s citizens, the acreage at the foot of Seventh Street was surreptitiously repurposed for brief periods in 1862 and 1864.

Forward My Brave Boys!: A History of the 11th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry CSA, 1861-1865
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: P582
ISBN: 9780881467055
Availability: In stock
Price: $30.00
FORWARD MY BRAVE BOYS tells the story of the 11th Tennessee Infantry, a unit comprised of ten companies of men raised from five Middle Tennessee counties in the early spring of 1861. Join these soldiers as they are transformed from raw citizens into a ferocious band of fighters, eventually becoming part of General Benjamin F. Cheatham’s hard-hitting division. This book takes the reader into their camps, on the march, and onto the line of battle through first-hand accounts taken from diaries, letters, and journals. Many never-before-published photographs of the soldiers, newly created battle maps, as well as an extensive biographical roster make this a valuable resource for historians and genealogists, and a great addition to the story of the Army of Tennessee and the war in the West.

An Everlasting Circle: Letters of the Haskell Family of Abbeville, South Carolina, 1861–1865
Edited by: Karen Stokes   Afterword by: James Everett Kibler
Product Code: H979
ISBN: 9780881467192
Availability: Not currently available. (Backorder policy)
Price: $35.00
AN EVERLASTING CIRCLE presents the Civil War correspondence of the Haskells, a prominent family of Abbeville, South Carolina. This outstanding collection of eloquent, compelling letters is unusual in that it includes the correspondence of seven brothers in arms. The Haskell brothers were literate, well-educated men, most of whom became officers highly regarded for their ability, courage, and character. Their letters are particularly strong in documenting the beginning days of the war in Charleston, as well as many significant battles in Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. They also tell the love story of Alexander C. Haskell and his bride Decca Singleton, a poignant romance chronicled by Mary Chesnut in her famous diary.

Texas Brigadier to the Fall of Atlanta: John Bell Hood
By author: Stephen Davis
Product Code: H980
ISBN: 9780881467208
Availability: Not currently available. (Backorder policy)
Price: $35.00
In this work, the first of two volumes, Hood's rise in rank is chronicled. In three years, 1861-1864, Hood rose from lieutenant to full general in the Confederate army. Davis emphasizes Hood's fatal flaw: ambition. Hood constantly sought promotion, even after he had found his highest level of competence as division commander in Robert E. Lee’s army. As corps commander in the Army of Tennessee, his performance was good, but no better. Promoted to succeed Johnston, Hood did his utmost to defend Atlanta against Sherman. In this latter effort he failed. But he had won his spurs, even if he had been denied greatness as a general.

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