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America’s Historically Black Colleges & Universities: A Narrative History, 1837–2009
By author: Bobby L. Lovett
Product Code: P509
ISBN: 9780881465341
Availability: In stock
Price: $25.00

This narrative provides a comprehensive history of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The book concludes that race, the Civil Rights movements, and black and white philanthropy had much affect on the development of these minority institutions. Northern white philanthropy had much to do with the start and maintenance of the nation’s HBCUs from 1837 into the 1940s. Even from 1950 to 1970, HBCUs depended upon financial support of philanthropic groups, benevolent societies, and federal and state government agencies, but the survival of HBCUs became dependent mostly on their own creative responses to the changing environment of higher education and have helped to shape our culture and society.

 


Between Fetters and Freedom: African American Baptists since Emancipation
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H906
ISBN: 9780881465402
Availability: In stock
Price: $35.00
The essays in BETWEEN FETTERS AND FREEDOM explore a number of issues bearing on post-Civil War African American Baptists. With limited resources at their disposal, precisely what did freedom mean? Would African American Baptist organizations be recognized as legitimate by white peer organizations? What sort of internal stress would African American organizations face as they gained traction in the black community, and what sort of stress would a rapidly changing culture place on those organizations and the people who made them what they were? Through it all, preachers and lay people alike wondered how their voices would be heard above the din.

In His Own Words: Houston Hartsfield Holloway’s Slavery, Emancipation, and Ministry in Georgia
Product Code: H909
ISBN: 9780881465457
Product Format: Book
Availability: In stock
Price: $35.00
Houston Hartsfield Holloway (1844–1917) was born enslaved in upcountry Georgia, taught himself to read and write, learned the blacksmith trade, was emancipated by Union victory in 1865, and served as an ordained traveling preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church from 1870 to 1883. He devoted the remainder of his life to his family, his blacksmith trade, and his local church. Holloway’s 24,000-word autobiography offers a rare working-class perspective on life during some of the most transformative years of US history. Footnotes provide supplementary biographical information for nearly two hundred relatives, neighbors, friends, and coworkers named in Holloway’s narrative. An appendix includes nineteen extended biographical sketches. The book is illustrated with photographs and three detailed maps of Holloway’s home neighborhoods and preaching assignments.

Andrew Young and the Making of Modern Atlanta
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Product Code: H921
ISBN: 9780881465877
Availability: In stock
Price: $29.00
ANDREW YOUNG AND THE MAKING OF MODERN ATLANTA tells the story of the decisions that shaped Atlanta’s growth from a small, provincial Deep South city to an international metropolis impacting and influencing global affairs. When Mayor William Hartsfield coined the term “City too Busy to Hate” in the 1950s, who would have imagined that within fifty years Atlanta would have the world’s busiest airport, rank as the eighth largest metropolitan area in the United States or, that this once racially-segregated city would host the Centennial Olympic Games and play host to the world in 1996? Atlanta provides a unique case study for an alternative vision of the relationships among leaders in corporations, government, and communities. The book tracks the development of the Atlanta Way, a strategy for economic development that features cross-racial cooperation—from the foundation in Reconstruction era Atlanta to the Olympic Games.

The Second Coming of the Invisible Empire: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s
By author: William Rawlings
Product Code: P556
ISBN: 9780881466430
Availability: In stock
Price: $25.00
Fifty years after the end of the Civil War, William Joseph Simmons, a failed Methodist minister, formed a fraternal order that he called The Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Organized primarily as a money-making scheme, it shared little but its name with the Ku Klux Klan of the Reconstruction Era. With its avowed creed of “One Hundred Percent Americanism,” support of Protestant Christian values, white supremacy, and the rejection of all things foreign, this new Klan became, for a brief period of time in the mid-1920s, one of America’s most powerful social and political organizations.

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