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The Church Without the Church: Desert Orthodoxy in Flannery O’Connor’s “Dear Old Dirty Southland”
By author: M. K. Shaddix

In the fifty years since her death, Flannery O’Connor studies have been conventionally delimited to two critical parameters: the South and the Church of Rome. This work challenges the conception of O’Connor as inherent to a monolithic South and to orthodox Roman Catholicism by problematizing the “Southern Gothic” trope, positing a non-canonical Southern realism, and repositioning O’Connor as essentially ecumenical in her private theology. The study contextualizes O’Connor’s work within the American scene by detailing the varied political and literary histories of the “North” and “South” as well as opposing the notion of region-specific aesthetics and a native anti-realist mode in the South.

Death, and the Day’s Light: Poems
By author: James Dickey   Edited by: Gordon Van Ness   Foreword by: Christopher Dickey

In 1996, as James Dickey struggled with his impending death and endeavored to overcome it—an effort that had always engaged his imagination— he re-established his priorities. Recognizing that he would die from suffocation brought on by fibrosis of the lungs, he attempted to wring two long poems, “Show Us the Sea” and “For Jules Bacon,” from his earlier works and from his old self, not the drunken genius but the football player and weight lifter, the combat aviator and caring father. The transformation was, in all-important respects, a resurrection.

These two lengthy poems, together with shorter poems, are thus, literally, the “last motion” but thematically, these works allude to his previous poetic efforts and summarize his life as death approached. The volume continues the concerns that were always Dickey’s primary interests: family, war, death, and love. Moreover, the poetry echoes, in its images and dramatic resolutions, earlier works. While these poems depict the inevitability of death, they also reveal the redemptive quality of that light and acknowledge the transience of its glory.

Death, and the Day’s Light, the volume of poetry James Dickey was working on when he died, offers the writer’s final views on love and death, fathers and sons, and war and resurrection. This volume constitutes an invaluable addition to the canon of a major American poet and allows for a complete understanding of his oeuvre.



In the Land of the Living: Wartime Letters by Confederates from the Chattahoochee Valley of Alabama and Georgia
Edited by: Ray Mathis   With: Douglas Clare Purcell
This unique book, originally published in a limited edition in 1982 and out of print for many years, is the most comprehensive collection of Civil War letters written by residents of Southeastern Alabama and Southwestern Georgia to be published. Poignant in emotion, informative in detail, and broad in scope, the correspondence contained here provides us with a unique opportunity to understand the Civil War and its effect on individuals and families from an intensely personal perspective. The writers, the great majority of them unlettered and expressing themselves in a disarmingly honest manner in their heartfelt missives, collectively paint a compelling portrait of a watershed moment in national history from a regional viewpoint. They make well-known events tangible and lesser-known sidebars illuminating.

Of Sympathy and Selfishness: The Moral and Political Philosophy of Adam Smith
Edited by: Charlotte C. S. Thomas

Adam Smith is best known for his magisterial Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, but his other great work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, is as deserving of serious study. In this volume, scholars in economics, philosophy, and political science take up questions that range throughout Smith’s work, seeking to find connections between his moral theory and political economy. 

This volume, based on the 2013 A. V. Elliot Conference on Great Books and Ideas at Mercer University, represents a great diversity of disciplinary perspectives. Its authors take up a wide range of concerns that exist in the intersection of Smith’s political and moral theory. It also includes several articles that attempt to compare his work to thinkers that preceded and followed him, coming from as far back in the tradition as the Italian Renaissance, and moving forward in history to claim Smith’s relevance for contemporary research in experimental economics.




New Releases

Selected Spiritual Writings of Anne Dutton: Eighteenth-Century, British-Baptist, Woman Theologian: Volume 7: Words of Grace
By author: JoAnn Ford Watson
Volume 7: Words of Grace is the last volume of letters rounding out Anne Dutton's correspondence as a significant spiritual writer and encourager of revival and growth in holiness. Particularly important is the precious treasure of her seventeen letters sent to the Rev. George Whitefield and his friends and acquaintances in 1745 to encourage his work and ministry in England and in the colonies, as well as his orphanage in Bethesda. Also included are two additional 1745 letters—one on the being and working of sin and the other on the duty and privilege of a believer—sent to Whitefield's Society at the Tabernacle in London. Three collections of Dutton's letters—Volumes I (1740), IV (1746), and VIII (1750)—on spiritual subjects addressed to relations and friends also appear in this volume. These letters show her to be a spiritual director, guide, and voice of holiness in evangelical revival in England in the eighteenth century.

The Color of All Things: 99 Love Poems
By author: Philip Lee Williams

Moving and filled with unexpected ideas and imagery, The Color of All Things is a love letter from one man to one woman, but it offers love from each of us to all of us. Brimming with a touching and generous joy, this is a book of everyday needs that can only be filled with a genuine and lasting love. This is the third volume of poetry from Philip Lee Williams, following on his Elegies for the Water and his national book of the year (Books and Culture magazine) The Flower Seeker: An Epic Poem of William Bartram. Like his other volumes of poetry, The Color of All Things moves slowly through the natural world without sentimentality but with surefooted grace and lovely rhythms. Georgia poet laureate Judson Mitcham says that in Williams’s poetry we hear “the distinctive voice of a poet who knows how to tell the stories that matter, how to hold still and take a good look at the natural world and let himself be filled with praise, a poet who knows how to find the right prayer and how to pray it.”



Kiss of the Jewel Bird
By author: Dale Cramer

Good ole boy Dickie Frye vanishes from the Georgia hills and the urbane Fletcher Carlyle bursts onto the New York publishing scene, winning the Nobel Prize for literature. But when a psychotic rampage lands Carlyle in Weatherhaven, eminent psychologist Anton Kohl finds himself talking to Dickie Frye. Kohl’s instincts tell him Frye is not lying—but what he says can’t possibly be true. A fallen priest comes out of Sumerian mythology, the love of Kohl’s life comes out of his past, and a chicken comes out of a posh apartment on Central Park West to meet his fate. Anton Kohl’s carefully constructed world is about to be deconstructed.One part fable and one part Southern yarn, Kiss of the Jewel Bird soars from ancient Mesopotamia to modern-day Manhattan, rewriting history and opening a window onto a wider, more magical world, where the path to destiny is anything but straight.



Reading Life: On Books, Memory, and Travel
By author: Michael Pearson
A unique blend of memoir, literary appreciation, and travel narrative, Reading Life is a series of interrelated essays tracking the relationship between books and experience, dramatizing and reflecting on how stories lead us into the world, and how we transform that engagement with the world back into personal narrative. A love story about books and travel, Reading Life is, by turns, comic and serious. Chapters shift in tone—from a lyrical quality akin to Adam Gopnik’s to a tongue-in-cheek humor reminiscent of Ian Frazier’s. The book transports the reader from the high desert landscape of Cather’s New Mexico and the rocky coastline of E. B. White’s Maine to the pilgrimage paths of Cervantes’s Spain and the hallucinogenic heat of Bowles’s Morocco. At the heart of Reading Life is the belief that stories are vital to our existence. Pearson invokes the same spirit that Tim O’Brien did in The Things They Carried when he said, “Stories are for joining the past to the future… Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember except the story.” Books, like travel, compel us to venture into new worlds, to renew our acquaintance with old ones, and, ultimately, to learn how to see. Books are both window and mirror, allowing a view of something deep in us and a glimpse of some distant truth beyond what is familiar and known. Willie Morris, former editor of Harper’s, said, “Michael Pearson is one of our nation’s finest memoirists.”

To the Gates of Atlanta: From Kennesaw Mountain to Peach Tree Creek, 1–19 July 1864
By author: Robert D. Jenkins Sr.

To the Gates of Atlanta covers the period from the Confederate victory at Kennesaw Mountain, 27 June 1864, leading up to the Battle of Peach Tree Creek, 20 July 1864, and the first of four major battles for Atlanta that culminated in the Battle of Jonesboro, 31 August and 1 September 1864.

To the Gates of Atlanta also gives the important, but previously untold stories of the actions and engagements that befell the sleepy hamlet of Buckhead and the surrounding woods that today shelter many parts of Atlanta’s vast community. 

From Smyrna to Ruff’s Mill, Roswell to Vinings, Nancy Creek to Peach Tree Creek, and Moore’s Mill to Howell’s Mill, To the Gates of Atlanta tells the story of each as part of the larger story which led to the fall of The Gate City of the South.




Upcoming

Fresh Water from Old Wells
By author: Cindy Henry McMahon

Cindy Henry McMahon’s family history is a slide show of the turbulent South: a thwarted lynch mob on a Georgia preacher’s front porch; the integration of Mercer University and Macon, Georgia’s Vineville Baptist Church; Birmingham, 1963; Martin Luther King, Jr.’s march to Selma; Koinonia Farm and the germination of Habitat for Humanity; inner-city activism and counter-culture communities in the woods. After a lifetime of hearing these stories but never fully understanding them, McMahon set out with a map and tape recorder to learn three things: (1) how the Civil Rights Movement and its aftermath shaped—or misshaped—her father; (2) how growing up in a family with this embittered, violent, and then absent father shaped her; and (3) how she survived it all remarkably intact. The result is her memoir, Fresh Water from Old Wells. It weaves together the regional and national events of the volatile 1960s and 70s, her family’s tumultuous Southern saga, and the stories of her own quest, which finally allows her to unclench her fist and release years of resentment and anger.



In the Beginning: The Martin Luther King Jr. Chapel at Morehouse College
Edited by: Echol Nix Jr.   Foreword by: Hugh M. Gloster Jr.

In the Beginning highlights the history of the world’s largest religious memorial to the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Inspired essays on education, social justice, nonviolence, peace, ecumenism, and civil and human rights are offered in honor of Lawrence Edward Carter, Sr., founding dean of the Martin Luther King, Jr. International Chapel.

This book is a lasting tribute and valuable contribution to the history and educational mission of Morehouse College.

Contributors include Lewis V. Baldwin, Thomas O. Buford, Delman L. Coates, Jason R. Curry, Norm Faramelli, Peter Goodwin Heltzel, Barbara Lewis King, Douglas E. Krantz, Bill J. Leonard, Otis A. Maxfield, Echol Nix, Jr., Harold Oliver, Peter Paris, Samuel K. Roberts, Prince El Hassan bin Talal, Harold Dean Trulear, Edward P. Wimberly, Vincent L. Wimbush, and Virgil Wood.



Tree Heresies: Poems
By author: William Wright
William Wright’s eighth collection of poems is an expansive personal journey that includes poems about subjects as varied as a farm woman forsaken by her husband, yellow jackets, insomnia, a mountain witch, salt marshes, a ditch filled with rainwater, and even a post-apocalyptic portrait of the last person on Earth. Beginning with “Prologue,” a piece that embeds a kaleidoscopic, novel-like vision of a small agricultural town and a few of its inhabitants, these poems capture the exterior world and recontextualize its many forms through a dreamlike logic, harnessing radiant imagery and strong aural texture through lines and words that stir both mind and heart. Here, Wright reveals how the most luminous forms often dwell in even the darkest subjects and images.

The Triumph of the Ecunnau-Nuxulgee: Land Speculators, George M. Troup, State Rights, and the Removal of the Creek Indians from Georgia and Alabama, 1
By author: William W. Winn

Published jointly with the Historic Chattahoochee Commission. Triumph of the Eccunna Nuxulgee is the first book to chronicle the tragic saga of Indian Removal with a specific focus on the Chattahoochee Valley of Georgia and Alabama. With candor and objectivity, William W. Winn chronicles the duplicity, political maneuvering, and military force through which the native Creeks ultimately lost their lands, illuminating latent issues of morality, sovereignty, cultural identity, and national destiny the affair brought to the surface. 



Watershed Days: Adventures (a Little Thorny & Familiar) in the Home Range
By author: Thorpe Moeckel

In Watershed Days, the reader embarks on a wide array of adventures shared in seasonal order over a period of two years, 2005-2007, yet spanning in memory back to the author’s youth. 

Infused with a blend of ruggedness and sensitivity, the writing is ripe, wry, and roving, ever attuned to the natural world. When the focus is not on the immediate homestead activities of making apple butter, telling stories to his child at bedtime, coming to terms with an aging dog, planting fruit trees, building garden beds, stacking firewood, butchering hogs, keeping chickens, hunting deer behind the barn, Moeckel zooms in on his escapes to the near woods and rivers, creeks and coasts—surfing, canoeing, fishing, even skateboarding on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

The twenty-four adventures are woven into a subtle, cohesive whole, providing a textured portrait of a young man, his family, and their evolving intimacy and distance with each other and the natural world, the 18-acre homestead to which they have just moved and started working, as well as the woods and rivers of Virginia’s Jefferson National Forest just down Arcadia Road.




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