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Half of What I Say Is Meaningless
By author: Joseph Bathanti
HALF OF WHAT I SAY IS MEANINGLESS is a series of memoirs, set by turns in Joseph Bathanti’s hometown of Pittsburgh as well as in his ultimate home in North Carolina where he landed in 1976 as a VISTA Volunteer assigned to the North Carolina Department of Correction. Though these essays are not queued chronologically, they form a seamless chronicle of contemplation on the indelible stamp of home, family, ancestry, and spirituality, regardless of locale.

The Invisible Hand in the Wilderness: Economics, Ecology, and God
By author: Malcolm Clemens Young
Most environmental theologians focus their efforts on inspiring a love for the natural world. They seek out metaphors and images from the world’s scriptures to create an ethical revolution so that people will begin to passionately care for the earth. The problem with this approach is that most people already appreciate nature. However, the values that direct their lives at work and as consumers are more important to them. They are more likely to derive their sense of meaning and articulate their goals using the symbols and methodologies of economics. This book brings together insights from three fields: economics, ecology, and theology in order to construct a more healthy and productive picture of human wellbeing. Economic ideas have a theological history that needs to be addressed if we are to begin healing the world.


New Releases

The Flower Hunter and the People: William Bartram in the Native American Southeast
Edited by: Matthew Jennings
William Bartram has rightly been hailed as an astute, perceptive chronicler of Native American societies. In some ways he was able to see beyond the dominant ideologies of his day, some of which divided the world’s peoples into categories based on perceived savagism and civility. This was a noble effort, and worthy of praise more than two centuries later. Bartram could also use Native American civilization as a foil for an emerging white American society he saw as crass and grasping. Writing in this romantic mode, he was capable of downplaying the extent to which Native communities were fully part of the modern world that they and European invaders created together.

Georgia’s Confederate Monuments: In Honor of a Fallen Nation
By author: Gould B. Hagler Jr.
GEORGIA'S CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS is the product of two decades of work, during which time the author has traveled throughout the state to photograph the memorials to the men and women of the Confederate States of America, to study their inscriptions, and to document information about their construction.

House Proud: A Social History of Atlanta Interiors, 1880-1919
By author: Lori Eriksen Rush
From middle-class cottages to Gilded Age mansions, HOUSE PROUD: A SOCIAL HISTORY OF ATLANTA INTERIORS, 1880-1919 presents a view of Atlanta, reflected through the city’s most highly prized resource, its homes. Richly illustrated with archival photographs and annotated with historical commentary, HOUSE PROUD traces Atlanta’s response to national trends in interiors and furnishings. It also identifies the tastemakers—those architects and interior decorators who helped craft Atlanta’s image as a “City of Beautiful Homes.”

Separation of Church and State: Founding Principle of Religious Liberty
By author: Frank Lambert
Frank Lambert tackles the central claims of the Religious Right "historians" who insist that America was conceived as a "Christian State," that modern-day "liberals" and "secularists" have distorted and/or ignored the place of religion in American history, and that the phrase "the separation of church and state" does not appear in any of the founding documents and is, therefore, a myth created by the Left. He discusses what separates "bad" history from "good" history, and concludes that the self-styled "historians" of the Religious Right create a "useful past" that enlists the nation's founders on behalf of present-day conservative religious and political causes. The result exposes the Religious Right "history" as fabrications and half-truths. In fact, one of the foundational principles of the Constitution is that of separation as the key to safeguarding freedom: separation of powers, separation of federal and state governments, and separation of church and state.

The Story Warm Springs : Legacy & Legende Warm Springs : Legacy & Legend
By author: F. Martin Harmon
From Native American legends to resort era beginnings, from direct involvement by the elite families of West Georgia to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s forty-one visits to his adopted state, and from the amazing polio generation and one of mankind’s most significant accomplishments to near closure, rebirth, and a myriad of what-might-have-beens. This is the complete story of Warm Springs, a story of pioneer beginnings and regional development, state and federal political intrigue, romantic suspicions and questionable ethics, social causes and lasting initiatives, civil and disability rights, medical origins and heartwarming success stories. It’s a compilation of individual stories that have never been told before.


Upcoming

Blessed Assurance: The Life and Art of Horton Foote
By author: Marion Castleberry   Foreword by: Hallie Foote
For more than seventy years, beginning in 1939, when he penned his first play, Wharton Dance, Horton Foote was regarded as one of America’s most revered dramatists. With his probing and perceptive dramas, he succeeded in charting the landscape of small-town America while creating classics of modern theatre and film that have found devoted audiences around the world. Foote wrote more than a hundred plays and screenplays for cinema, theatre, and television, and was equally successful in all three mediums--a record of variety and productivity unmatched by any other writer. With a foreword by Hallie Foote, this biography is the most thorough and comprehensive to date of American dramatist Horton Foote. Drawing on the author's complete access to Foote's personal papers and extended conversations with the writer, his family, and his friends, Marion Castleberry discusses all the important aspects of Horton Foote's life and career--his Wharton, Texas childhood, his devotion to family, his deep Christian faith, his abiding passion for the theatre, and his successes as a screenwriter and independent filmmaker.

Farming, Friends & Fried Bologna Sandwiches
By author: Renea Winchester
Tucked behind a magnolia tree on a busy Georgia road is a magical place--a simple country farm, unchanged by time. On this little strip of land, chickens scratch greetings and goats bleat hello. Sweet yellow corn grows tall, and curly bean vines reach for the sky. A burly tractor and a fifty-year-old Chevy wait inside the shed, ready for action. For 82-year-old Billy Albertson, his farm reflects a time before folks were hurried, or technology ruled our lives. Families grew gardens and feasted on fresh vegetables, adults spent time on front porches comparing stories, and children scampered barefoot through the grass waiting their turn at the hand-cranked ice cream freezer. Spending time with friends on the farm is Billy's life. Here you don't have to be a gardener or blood kin to be family.

Glimmerglass
By author: Marly Youmans
Perhaps it was a sense of estrangement from the everyday that drew Cynthia Sorrel to the village of Cooper Patent. The failed painter was lured by the gatehouse with its seven doors, the lake with its tower, and the magical air of a place that couldn't quite decide whether it was fictional, mythic, or real. The gatehouse should have been a first clue that she was on a journey, and soon she begins to glimpse and then to pursue a figure in the woods near her house, convinced she has seen the Muse.

It Is Written: My Life in Letters
By author: Philip Lee Williams
Filled with colorful details and rich with photographs of the author's life, It Is Written is a beautifully written page-turner about how one person turns the raw materials of life into art. Over a thirty-year career as a published author of fiction, poetry, and essays, Philip Lee Williams has become one of the South's most-honored writers. Now, Williams tells the story of his creative life in an open, jaunty, and often hilarious autobiography.

Save My Place
By author: Olivia deBelle Byrd
Blessed with an innate optimism and a magical childhood, Elisabeth Belle Sterling discovers that the path to happily-ever-after love is not as easily obtained as she had always imagined. The Camelot-like love she longs for seems like only a dream until she meets the handsome Kincaid Patterson, a West Point graduate who carries a dark secret from his past. Theirs is a passionate and unconditional love that has to confront a painful past, heart-searing separation, and the greatest of all tragedies. But the biggest obstacle is the loss of faith that threatens to undermine all that they have. Set in the South during the 1960s and 70s against the backdrop of the Vietnam War, Save My Place is a beautifully written love story of two people who search deep within their souls to save each other. This book also available in e-book format through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Kobo.

Song of the Vagabond Bird
By author: Terry Kay
When he arrives on Neal's Island to begin ten days of intensive group therapy to treat his obsession for a woman he cannot forget, he brings with him the pseudonym of Bloodworth. Vastly different as individuals, yet suffering the same crippling malady of obsession, five men are not prepared for the antics of Dr. Carson X. Willingham. He is maverick and madman, a brilliant investigator of his subjects, a mesmerizing performer, and either a genius or a charlatan with a rare gift of persuasion. Willingham is also a man with his own demons, caused by his own history of obsession. It is in this environment that Bloodworth finds himself faced with the delicate question of honesty as he tries to free the memory of his Kalee, and begin his new journey into the uncertainty of what might be. This book also available in e-book format through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Kobo.

Sweetwater Blues
By author: Raymond L. Atkins
Rodney Earwood and Palmer Cray had been best friends for as long as either could remember. They were brothers in all but the genetic sense, each born late in the lives of good women who had given up on the dream of motherhood by the time their respective miracles occurred. They wandered the hills of North Georgia, hunted the pine woods, fished the cool, green streams, and camped under the stars. They shared each other's clothing, each other's families, and each other's homes. They grew into tall young men, and on a hot May afternoon right after they turned eighteen, they both graduated from Sweetwater High School, numbers seven and eight in the crooked, sweaty line that held a class of thirty of Sweetwater's finest. Shortly thereafter, Rodney and Palmer flew a Camaro into a tree, Palmer flew into a haystack, Rodney flew into the great beyond, and nothing in Sweetwater was ever the same again. This book also available in e-book format through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Kobo.

William Dean and the First Chinese Study Bible
By author: Chung-Yan Joyce Chan
Scholarship in the area of Chinese Bible translation history has been devoted primarily to the production of the UNION VERSION. This book will examine a significant, yet much overlooked Chinese Bible translation project produced by William Dean (1807–1895), an American Baptist missionary to the Chinese people in Siam and China. This study utilizes extensive primary sources in both the English and Chinese language from the American Baptist Historical Society Archives and the Bible Society Library at the Cambridge University Library. Published jointly with the Acadia Centre for Baptist and Anabaptist Studies.


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